Beast Quest is aimed at both kids and their parents

This article by Andy Robertson originally appeared on Forbes on 4th March 2015. It is available at this link.

Having reported on Beast Quest, the new iOS and Android game from Miniclip for sometime, I finally got to see the finished product. What better way to test it than in the hands of a nine year old fan of the Beast Quest books.

Beast Quest

If you’ve not heard of the Beast Quest series you are probably not in the right demographic. Young boys have lapped up around 14 million copies though. Marry this with Miniclip’s 70 million users each month and Beast Quest should do well for them — provided the game is as good as they say.

In the game you take on the role of Tom, who partners with Elenna to battle the different monsters and enemies of the land of Avantia. The story in the game is not only linear story missions, but an open world to explore and light role-play character progression. Tom and Elenna need to work in tandem to progress with the player controlling Tom throughout.

Trying out the game at home, my test family quickly took to the exploration, combat and role play elements. Although on a tablet device this would be as at home on consoles. Games like The Legend of Zelda and Infinity Blade spring to mind.

The game with is free to play with moderate in-app purchases, will eventually take you through each of the worlds featured in the first six Beast Quest books. Each location offers a different Beast, along with a range of varied enemies and allies. As mentioned, we play as hero Tom, journeying through the kingdom of Avantia on his quest to free the Beasts from Malvel’s evil spells.

The Beast Quest books are cleverly designed to appeal to grown-ups as well as children — something I can vouch for as they have become my go-to choice for my son’s bedtime stories. When visiting the studio, Sam Smith community manager, outlined how the game was aiming to mirror this. “We’re hoping that this is something that kids can play with parents, but also the parents will end up playing it themselves when the kids are in bed. We want everything to be simple enough for kids to understand it but with depth for older players.”

Playing through the first 30 minutes of the game you encounter a range of things to do, from hunting down healing herbs in the environment to going after Nanook. Then there were Hungry Wolves, Ice Marauders and Dark Fang enemies to fight.

These encounters are in third person view and offer a variety of dodge and attack options each triggered with taps and swipes on the device. As the battle heats up things will become more difficult as multiple enemies need to be fended off and attacked. Do well in these fights and you are awarded gold and experience to heal and upgrade your character.

The the game releasing soon it will be interesting to see how successful it is at attracting the young Beast Quest readers to a more action oriented experience. If my house hold is anything to go by it will join other success mobile games like Angry Birds Transformers and up and coming titles like Sick Bricks.

For more on Beast Quest by Andy Robertson, check out WIRED, the latest issue of 110% Gaming, GeekDad.com and FamilyGamerTV.